Data day. Working on #NativeVote18 #SheRepresents spreedsheets

I have been working on #NativeVote18 lists … folks running for state legislatures (55 and counting, 25 women and 30 men). I have also been working on a list of Native American women who have run for state wide offices and Congress. Fascinating stuff. (I was thinking of a trivia game I could post.) There have been four candidates for governor, three for Lt. Gov., and 12 for Congress. First statewide race that I have found, 1978. Cool stuff. #SheRepresents Will post this soon. I want to make a graphic.

Here is the #NativeVote18 state legislature list. Who’s missing?

One thing I should mention: Google has changed the way you can access pictures and it no longer is compatible with fusion tables. So I am looking for a solution or a new spreadsheet system. #Transparency

 

https://www.google.com/fusiontables/DataSource?docid=1i_wzJ_tneyBQ-A_htt1xnDqeo3wEhyXQ8KI9mGQt

And just like that … it’s back to square one for healthcare, budgets and taxes

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Trahant Reports

So the Senate (and therefore the House) plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act, destroy Medicaid as we know it, and shell out billions in tax cuts for the wealthy is no more. Monday night Utah Sen. Mike Lee and Kansas Sen. Jerry Moran said they would vote against even debating the Senate healthcare bill. So it was defeated by unanimous opposition of Democrats, the Senate’s most conservative members, and Republican Maine Sen. Susan Collins who opposed the Medicaid cuts.

“Regretfully, it is now apparent that the effort to repeal and immediately replace the failure of Obamacare will not be successful,” McConnell said. “So, in the coming days, the Senate will vote to take up the House bill with the first amendment in order being what a majority of the Senate has already supported in 2015 and that was vetoed by then-President Obama: a repeal of Obamacare with a two-year delay to provide for a stable transition period to a patient-centered health care system that gives Americans access to quality, affordable care.”

So plan B, supported by President Donald J. Trump, is a repeal of the Affordable Care Act without a plan to figure out what a replacement looks like. Trump tweeted: “If Republican Senators are unable to pass what they are working on now, they should immediately REPEAL, and then REPLACE at a later date!”

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But that will not be easy either. The idea of a repeal without a plan is crazy when you’re talking about such a huge chunk of the economy. And many Republican senators have already said so. As I have been writing (often) the problem is that the Republicans do not have a governing majority.  They are split. Hopelessly. They really needed their healthcare bill (something they all campaigned on) as a glue to keep their coalition together. Now it gets tougher.

There are practical problems with a “just repeal” approach too. The Senate language has to be narrowly drafted on fiscal issues in order to meet the test of a budget reconciliation bill. This process is arcane but it eliminates any filibuster by Democrats. It also means there will be no outright repeal (which would require 60 votes to stop the filibuster) just the budget applications of the Affordable Care Act. Complicated, right? The budget the Senate is working off of requires a billion dollars in savings from any repeal.

Even this will be tricky. First there will need to be consensus for a new vote to bring up the House bill. (It’s called a Motion to Proceed.) That measure would be open to amendments, including the repeal provision. (The president must have just been informed about this problem. He tweeted: “The Senate must go to a 51 vote majority instead of current 60 votes. Even parts of full Repeal need 60. 8 Dems control Senate. Crazy!”

That’s just one of the crazy, sticky issues for a repeal amendment (not to mention any other amendment that surfaces). Language that would lift the individual mandate to purchase insurance could also eliminate coverage for pre-existing conditions — and doing that would make health insurance unworkable for the companies. This could cause widespread market panic.

Depending on how it’s written, an outright repeal could impact Indian Country because it could include the Indian Health Care Improvement Act. The Senate and House plans were careful to sidestep that issue. This is a blank slate. A political danger zone.

However the Senate’s political implosion also shows how difficult it will be for the House and Senate to pass a budget, lift the debt ceiling, and get on with other important work.

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The House released its budget plan Tuesday morning and it sets its course for using the reconciliation process too. (In theory: Life is so much easier if you don’t need votes from Democrats.) That budget bill will be marked up on Wednesday and it will be tough to win a majority of Republicans. It has every controversial Trump project included, money for a border wall, cuts to social welfare programs, including Medicare. Some Members don’t like the increases in military spending coupled with sharp budget cuts for domestic programs, more than $200 billion worth. (It will be up to committees to figure out where the cuts would happen.) Other Members think there ought to be more cuts. And to make this process even more complicated, the House budget includes tax provisions. That only makes the task ahead more difficult.

Buckle your seat belts. — Mark Trahant

 

 

 

 

 

Updated numbers: A look at Native American women elected to office

***Updated***

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Good morning.

A quick update. So a reader points out that I really ought to include Debora Juarez in this list (and in the broader review of Native women in office). And it’s a spot on suggestion.

So I have added Juarez and a couple of county commissioners I know about … but there should be more. Please let me know about women serving on city councils, as mayors, county commissions, etc. Montana? South Dakota? Alaska?

Do you know of any Native women who are elected as city and county officials that should be included? Thank you.

I am working on a piece about Native American women who were elected to office at the state (or, I wish, at the federal) level.

**City of Seattle Council Member Debora Juarez Blackfeet NP
***Coconio County, Arizona Board of Supervisors Lena Fowler Navajo D
***McKinley County, New Mexico County Commission Carolyn Bowman-Muskett Navajo D
***McKinley County, New Mexico County Commission Genevieve Jackson Navajo D

This is my spreadsheet. Please take a look and let me know if anyone is missing.

I have identified 62 American Indian or Alaska Natives in state legislatures — 25 women (40 percent) and 37 men (60 percent). As a comparison, nationally, women make up just under a quarter of all elected legislative seats. (1,363 members or 24.4 percent).  And that means Native American women are 1.834 percent of the women who serve in office.

Also eight Native American women have run for Congress and two have run for the vice presidency.

I am planning a story and an interactive graphic for the weekend. (It’s taking me longer than I planned. I keep getting distracted by the frenetic pace of the Trump administration.

Thanks for any help (or ideas). — Mark

Draft. Native Legislators spread sheet

Good morning. Writing. So I started last year thinking that 2016 would be a record year in terms of Native Americans winning office at state and congressional level. Did not happen. But here is a twist: Seven states now have Native American legislators in their leadership.

Spreadsheet of elected Native leaders shows 57 elected in 15 states.

Who am I missing?

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1f6__GVaWJjpKSTFvCBZDef5vL5gIzdAsn15UyXTB1M8/edit?usp=sharing

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