Indian Country politics and public policy

Commentary by Mark Trahant

 

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Glacier County Commissioner Michael DesRosier (Photo via Facebook)

Counting every vote (again)

TrahantReports

Every election there is new evidence that, yes, your vote does count. (This week, for example, there has been stories from voters who voted for the United Kingdom to leave Europe only because they thought their vote did not count. Whoops.)

Now a race in  Blackfeet Country is being contested over three votes.

On the night of Montana’s primary election, Glacier County Commissioner Michael DeRosier appeared to have been defeated in the primary by challenger Jamie Evans by 42 votes.

But about a week later, after 131 provisional ballots were counted, the lead changed and DeRosier appeared to have won. On Wednesday the County Commission (absent DeRosier) will witness a recount tally to see if DeRosier’s three-vote lead continues to hold. Stay tuned. — Mark Trahant

Candace Begody-Begay fails to reach ballot

Former Navajo Times editor Candace Begody-Begay failed to quality for the November ballot for the Arizona state Senate. According to The Arizona Republic: “Not only were 59 percent of her signatures invalid, she failed to appear at a Friday court hearing despite assurances to state officials that she would be there.” The newspaper said under Arizona law she cannot run as a write-in because of a “sore loser” law.

Her husband, Carlyle Begay, remains a candidate for Congress in the Republican primary. Two other Navajo candidates, Shawn Redd, also a Republican, and Kayto Sullivan, a Democrat, are seeking that congressional seat.

Begody-Begay’s problem collecting signatures highlights the very problem for any Navajo running in a Republican primary. Even with support from Navajo voters, few of those voters are registered as Republicans or as unaffiliated voters. (Previous: Can one family build a Navajo Republican party?) Begody-Begay told the Navajo Times that she could not attend the court hearing because of a family emergency. “It’s safe to say there will be very little change in our district,” she told the Times. “The voters are the ones who are going to have to live with the consequences.”

Then again it’s hard to blame someone else for the requirements of actually running a campaign, such as gathering signatures, raising money, and doing what’s necessary to be a competitive candidate. — Mark Trahant

 

 

 

 

One thought on “#NativeVote16 – Only three vote margin and too few signatures to run

  1. Deb Krol says:

    The other half of Begody-Begay’s dilemma is that, as the Republic reported, many of the invalid signatures came from outside Legislative District 7. Not to be critical, but if you don’t understand election law or the requirement that the people signing your petition are actually living within the legislative boundaries, you probably wouldn’t be much of a lawmaker. But perhaps former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s iCivics project [visit https://www.icivics.org/ to learn more] could have been of help.

    Like

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